Salvador Dali RETURNS to Innerspace!

I’ve wonderful news, dear friends! Some of my long-time readers may recall that in August of 2012, due to financial struggles I had to part with a magnificent piece of music history – a rare copy of Salvador Dalí’s opéra-poème, Être Dieu. After discussing the piece with a fellow music lover, I revisited the market and as luck would have it, found what is likely the very copy I sold in 2012 available for purchase and at a very reasonable price. I wasted not a moment and placed my order, and today it arrived home safely!

For those not familiar with this ill-fated opera, the title translates to “Being God.” The six-part work features Dalí as God, Brigitte Bardot as an artichoke and Catherine the Great and Marilyn Monroe doing a striptease. (Because dadaism.)

Être Dieu suffered an astonishingly tragic history. It was originally published in an extremely rare 3LP box set by DCD, a small Spanish label with only 28 other releases to its name. It was re-released in a 3CD box published by German label Eurostar who subsequently went out of business, and there are few-to-no known performances of the work. Worse still, Dalí painted “Self-Portrait” (1972) to mark the composition of the opera, but the painting was auctioned by the United States Customs Service after being seized after Colombian drug lords tried to use the painting to launder money. (Salvador seriously couldn’t get a break!)

But a few copies of Eurostar’s deluxe edition survived. This edition is packaged in a blue velvet box set with a metallic gold engraving of Dalí’s signature, as well as a 326-page book containing scans of the original handwritten script, notes, and libretto in English, French, German & Spanish.

While Dalí, himself experienced great misfortune with this work, I am happy to report that good luck has come at last with its return to the Innerspace library.

Special thanks to the fellow listener out there who planted the seed of desire for me to reclaim this lost objet d’art!

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Published in: on February 28, 2017 at 5:06 pm  Comments (1)  
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Evocation Poème Symphonique

Once in a blue moon, (or in this case a blood moon), I shed my polished sophisticate exterior and get a little creative.  Tonight is that night, so light the incense, don your beret and check out what’s cookin’.

I seldom get into poetry, doing my best to avoid anything with a rhyme scheme or regular meter.  But I do fancy a particular strain of poem – nonsense verse and cut-up/plunderphonia.

John Lennon developed his own delightful style of jabberwock in his books, In His Own Write and A Spaniard in the Works which inspired my first exercises writing “Lennonish” in college.

And in more recent years I found a fascination with the history of plunderphonics, perhaps best-executed by James Joyce is his masterwork, Finnegans Wake.  This evening I tried my own hand at the cut-up method, constructing something of a self-portrait from fragments of my music library. The library will be my legacy and I hope it will survive far beyond my years, so its content seemed well-suited for such a task.

Evocation Poème Symphonique

pulse steady
a chance operation
in and out of phase
from houdini’s musical box
deep distance kontakt
and the kosmische braindance
i sing the body electric
strange overtones
intergalactic echowaves
funky breaks and solo flute
one finger snap and the jazz of tomorrow
tricks of the light
cirrus minor
the broken radio of Istanbul station
turn me loose
walking like a shadow
voodoo fusion or synesthesia
a prayer for the paranoid
an index of metals
walkin’ the blues
it’s wonderland syndrome
tones for mental therapy
justified
ancient
and bird’s lament
straight no chaser
alone again with the dawn coming up
we are the music makers
fast ‘n bulbous
and the curse of ka’zar
all this and more
tonight at innerspace

Regular readers will undoubtedly pick up on 20-30 references to favorites from my collection.  But I think it functions just as well without the cliff notes

Thanks for indulging me.  Back to our regularly-scheduled exercises in library management.