Electronic Love

I’ve just received the most WONDERFUL Christmas gift from one of my oldest and dearest friends. If every you’ve asked yourself, “what is the perfect gift for the audiophile who has everything?” this is precisely the sort of gift you should consider.

This is the Electronic Love Blueprint: A History of Electronic Music by the Dorothy design collective – an electrical schematic of a theremin mapping 200 inventors, innovators, artists, composers spanning the entire history of recorded sound. Key pioneers featured include Léon Theremin, Bob Moog, Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Cage, Brian Eno, Kraftwerk and Aphex Twin.

It loosely groups genres, from the obscure Musique Concrète (Pierre Schaeffer) to the better known Krautrock (Kraftwerk, Can, Tangerine Dream, Neu!, Faust, Cluster, Harmonia and Amon Düül II) Synthpop (Gary Numan, Human League, Depeche Mode, Yazoo and Pet Shop Boys) and Electronica (New Order, The Prodigy, Massive Attack, LCD Sound System and Daft Punk). There are also references to the experimental BBC Radiophonic Workshop and favourite innovating record labels Mute and Warp.

This metallic silver screen print on 120gsm Keaykolour Royal Blue uncoated paper measures 60 x 80cm and will be the pride of my listening room.

I’ve ordered a UK frame and can’t wait to display it!

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A Day Full of Wonderful Music!

This morning I took a trip to my old hometown of Rochester and made my routine pilgrimage to my favorite record store – The Bop Shop. The owner, Tom put a record in my hands and told me that I had to own it.

Tom has always been a wonderful source for musique concrete, minimalist works, early experimental electronic recordings and other lovely treasures of the avant-garde. Many of my favorite LPs are original pressings from his personal collection.

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The LP he held was John Cage • Christian Wolff, a 1963 album featuring Cage’s side-long “Cartridge Music” – one of Cage’s earliest attempts to produce live electronic music by manipulating turntable cartridges. I’ve known Tom for years and he has never steered me wrong and this latest LP is no exception. Wonderful stuff!

I also spotted a box set in his shop which I snatched up without hesitation. Readers may recall my copy of Cyril Ritchard reading Alice in Wonderland which included a facsimile clothbound hardcover copy of the 1865 first edition with all of the original illustrations. Today in store, I discovered that Ritchard had produced a reading of Through the Looking Glass as well! And it too included a copy of the 1872 hardcover. How could I pass it up?

Alice.JPG

Upon returning home I was struck by a recollection that a Kickstarter project had been initiated for a first-ever “Earthling Edition” of the historic Voyager Golden Record, (our message to the stars). As the Kickstarter page describes:

The Voyager Golden Record contains the story of Earth expressed in sounds, images, and science: Earth’s greatest music from myriad cultures and eras, from Bach and Beethoven to Blind Willie Johnson and Chuck Berry, Senegalese percussion to Solomon Island panpipes. Dozens of natural sounds of our planet — birds, a train, a baby’s cry — are collaged into a lovely audio poem called Sounds of Earth. There are spoken greetings in 55 human languages, and one whale language, and more than one hundred images encoded in analog that depict who, and what, we are.

The closest I’d come to the Voyager disc was the limited edition “A Glorious Dawn” single from Third Man Records. The single was composed and performed by Symphony of Science and credited to an auto-tuned Carl Sagan singing about the magnificence of the universe. And etched upon the second side of the disc is the image of the Golden Record.

carl-sagan-a-glorious-dawn-by-symphony-of-science-single-sided-7%22-reverse-etched-with-the-image-of-the-voyager-golden-record

As a tremendous fan of Carl Sagan’s work and his legacy, and as a “cultural curator” of historically significant recordings, this anniversary Voyager project was something I knew I had to support, and to claim a copy for my library if at all possible.

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The beautiful box set is being remastered by Timothy Ferris – the original producer of the Golden Record, and will include:

  • A cloth-covered box with gold foil inlay
  • Three translucent gold, heavyweight vinyl LPs in poly-lined paper sleeves
  • Three old-style tip-on jackets, black ink and gold foil
  • A hardback book showcasing the photographs and art featured on the original disc
  • A lithograph of Voyager Golden Record cover diagram, gold metallic ink on archival paper
  • A full-color plastic digital download card for all audio of the record in MP3 or FLAC

What a wonderful way to celebrate our message to space!

And it turned out that my hunch was aptly timed, as I found there were only five days remaining in the Kickstarter campaign, and pledging to the project is the only way to claim a copy of this special release! I pledged immediately and look forward to the album’s launch in 2017.

Check out the short official video for the project and pledge while you still can!

The Sound of Noise

Last night’s music-related film was The Sound of Noise (2010).

Sound of Noise

It’s a French film by writer/director Ola Simonsson who you likely know from the film short Music for One Apartment and Six Drummers (2001)

Here’s the original short:

The feature-length film unites the concepts of anarchism, Luigi Russolo’s classic manifesto, and the spontaneous performance art of Cage’s Theater Piece No. 1 from 1952 and the Happenings which followed throughout the 1960s. The result is an engaging and enjoyable film.

Here is the film’s trailer. Enjoy!

Highlights of John Cage and Morton Feldman – Exquisite Examples of Dynamic Range

This weekend’s research proved to be incredibly valuable, resulting in two wonderful musical discoveries.  And it began with The S.E.M. Ensemble.

From semensemble.org:

The S.E.M. Ensemble was founded in 1970 when Petr Kotik organized a group of musicians of the fellows at the Center of the Creative and Performing Arts, SUNY/Buffalo. The first S.E.M. Ensemble concert was presented in Buffalo at the Domus Theater and included works by Cornelius Cardew, John Cage, Petr Kotik and Rudolf Komorous.

In 1992, the SEM chamber ensemble was expanded into The Orchestra of the S.E.M. Ensemble with a debut concert at Carnegie Hall, presenting the first complete performance of Atlas Eclipticalis by John Cage (all 86 instruments).  The concert was an internationally celebrated event, lauded by audiences and critics from across the United States, Europe and Japan.

S.E.M. Ensemble

But another property unique to this performance makes it a must-own for all lovers of exceptional music.

For the last several years, DR-loudness-war.info has been crowd-sourcing a massive database mapping the dynamic range, (that is, the range from the quietest to the loudest sounds occurring in piece of music) for over 77,000 albums.  This database was created as a reaction to the Loudness War – the trend of record labels cutting off all the “highs” and “lows” of an album so that the entire album can be as loud as possible.

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Skrillex’s “Kyoto” – This is what the loudness war looks like.

It is this very recording – the S.E.M. Ensemble’s Concert for Piano & Orchestra, which tops the chart for dynamic range. In fact, the album holds both the #1 and #2 positions among all 77,522 recordings presently cataloged – one for the original CD release and the other for the subsequent digital download.

The recording is unlike any other musical experience I’ve had with my listening equipment.  The sound stage is open and well-defined and really gives the listener the feeling of a live modern classical performance.  My setup has a very neutral or transparent delivery which is well-suited to the more “academic” recordings I enjoy such as Berlin School electronic, drone and ambient musics.  I can say with certainty that this recording is a brilliant match for my setup and makes for a thrilling experience, both for its critical acoustic properties as well as for the cerebral pleasures it arouses in the listener.

While reviewing the Dynamic Range Database’s other highest-ranked recordings, I took note of Morton Feldman’s Late Piano Works Vol.3 performed by Steffen Schleiermacher.  AllMusic contributor, Blair Sanderson called the album “sublime”, speaking of the spaciousness and quietude of Feldman’s composition and of the incredible sensitivity and control with which Schleiermacher presents the featured selections.

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Feldman’s later piano works make for excellent study music, or simply a soundtrack for an evening of quiet reflection.  The Database is certainly correct – this is a wonderfully pensive and subtle recording which is sadly (and quite literally) drowned out by more modern victims of the Loudness War.  Put this on, turn down the lights, and awaken your senses to the subtle nuances of audiophilic delight.

5’50” of Pop – The Sound of Muzak

5'50'' of Pop

As an archivist of historically significant recordings, I thrive on sound that is experimental, that tests the limits of and challenges the very definition of what we call music.  I’m grateful that, for most hours of the day, I have the freedom to immerse myself in cerebral and inspiring sounds.

But once upon a time, not so very long ago, I worked a job where that sort of musical luxury was the stuff of pure fantasy.  For I, like so many of my young peers, spent each day in a world of retail Muzak.

Perhaps you’ve worked a similar job at one point of your life.  Perhaps you see no problem with Muzak as you can simply, “tune it out.”  Unfortunately, we are not all so lucky.

The Sound of Muzak

The Sound of Muzak

The soundtrack of my former workplace was a Muzak station comprising 100 pop songs repeated ad infinitum for the entirety of my retail servitude.   It was eight hours a day of Britney Spears, Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber, Shania Twain, Reba McEntire, Nickelback and Amy Grant… enough to drive any reasonable man insane.  But instead of succumbing to the madness, I made it a personal mission to transform my situation into something expressive and artful.

The result was 5’50” of Pop – a complex, atonal and aggressive short film effectively simulating the experience of living inside a forty-hour loop of teen pop-idols.  5’50” of Pop aims to transform formulaic, predictable, homogeneous pop music into something challenging, something arresting, and something dauntingly complex.

The film composites the music videos for every one of the songs I heard each day… played from start to finish… all at the same time.  The result is a cacophonous stream of abstract noise and an indiscernible collage of light and shadow, presenting the viewer with a visual and auditory experience completely unlike the content of which it was composed.

If you’ve never had the misfortune of working retail, please indulge me, for a mere 5’50” of Pop.

Embittered pretension aside, 5’50” is first a reactionary piece, but also serves as an honest criticism of the pop music status quo.  Contemporary pop is made to be instantly forgotten and shuffled through in a constant stream of predictability and irreverence.  More product than poetry, its cookie-cutter lyricism and melodic structure have abandoned all that made-great the genres it’s co-opted and mimicked in empty pantomime.

Thankfully, I’ve since freed myself from that terrible environment, and now spend my days soaking-in Frippertronic solos and tape music soundscapes.  So to any of my readers still-trapped in a similarly vapid and soulless work environ; take heart.  There are scores of beautiful music waiting for you.  Until then, keep tuning in.  The music will set you free.

[NOTE: Due to copyright claims from Warner Music and the Universal Music Group, this video is not available in Germany and may include advertisements.]

Readings in Modern Music

Anyone who follows this blog with any frequency knows how much of a stretch it is for me to dig a contemporary recording, let alone a modern track by a “band” instead of a composer.  Even scarcer still are the selections I enjoy which contain lyrics and any sort of verse structure akin to rock.

The above is particularly applicable at present as I’ve spent the past week delving deep into the masterworks of musique concrete and electroacoustic composition – recordings which not only abandon contemporary pop structures like lyricism and melody, but forgo the entire tonal system itself, instead favoring abstract and atonal plunderphonics!

So it is with immense surprise and satisfaction that I state the following – A user contacted me on last.fm this week and shared  an unsigned band’s recent video… and I absolutely loved it!

They call themselves Museum – four gents from Berlin who self-released their album, Traces Of on their own label – beat is murder.

museum band
Traces Of followed the release of two EPs – Exit Wounds and Old Firehand but the 2012 single “The Law” is the fan-recommended track which introduced me to their work.  (They actually do the whole lowercase-sentence-fragment thing but I’ve capitalized their releases here for the sake of readability.  Sorry lads.)

Their official site is inactive, simply stating that the album’s release is scheduled for Jul 6, 2012, however the band appears to be active with a performance scheduled at FiestaCity 2014 on Aug 29th – Place du Martyr, Verviers, Belgium.

This recording came onto my radar at quite an opportune time.  The first thing I noticed from the first 20 seconds of the tune’s music video was that the band had incorporated elements of tape music and musique concrete as the very foundation of the track.

The lyrics did not detract from the layering of minimal, looped sounds, as they too were cut up in a fragmented presentation which would have made Burroughs proud.  And while the kaleidoscopic video effect is nothing new, it works well with the track.

Check it out for yourself – “The Law” from Museum.

I began the week with the discovery of a historic jazz release in the Netherlands which should arrive in the post in the next 10 days (Stay tuned for a special feature with high-res photos once it arrives!)

I had been compiling data on the milestones of free jazz and was very happy to find one of them re-issued by Impulse! Records in 2011 – the same label which released the original recording in 1968.

Archie Shepp - Magic of Ju-Ju

The psychedelic cover art commanded my attention when I found it in a local record shop, and while I had never listened to Archie Shepp before I knew I had to check out this record.

I previewed it for a mere 30 seconds – whetting my sonic appetite with Shepp’s free jazz psychedelic tenor frenzy accompanied by five (count ’em – FIVE) talking drum percussionists.  30 seconds was all I needed.

I instantly purchased the record and added it to my jazz collection, delighted by my discovery but slightly irked that there was no mention of this album by any of the free jazz essentials lists I had compiled.  That’s just further evidence that you’ve really got to get out there and dig.

But on to today’s theme – Music Lit.  I knew it was going to be an intellectually stimulating week when I found Julian Cope’s legendary music crit, Krautrocksampler offered up on the Web in PDF format.  As you’re probably aware, this title is long out of print and the author has sworn never to reissue it.  Copies surface on various marketplaces for hundreds of dollars.   Thankfully, a dedicated fan painstakingly scanned every page of the book, and while it is hardly archival quality, it is the only way most of us will ever see the book.

Krautrocksampler

This will be a pleasure to peruse over the coming weeks, even in its crudely-photocopied form.

I picked up another jazz book from a local used bookshop as it was only a few dollars and I was curious to see what a writer would have to say about jazz in the middle of the era. The bulk of the text was written in 1962, with the “jazz-rock” chapter at the end likely added for the 1975 and 1979 printings.

What Jazz is About
Erlich’s perspective of jazz is hardly academic, and clearly it is not intended to be. The book’s approach is that of a simple love of the genre and acts as a guided tour through the history of its greatest influences, from African drum music to field hollers all the way up to the Third Stream and jazz-rock era.

From a historical context the book successfully builds a fundamental framework of jazz’s legacy. The language is elementary and makes for an effortless read, with a circular structure of artist introductions, childhoods, development, and lasting impacts.

However there are many titles available which better-examine what will soon be a century of jazz culture. There are very few references to What Jazz Is All About anywhere on the Web, and even fewer reviews. I’ve since moved on to better-known resources for further exploration of the genre.

History of Jazz

The History of Jazz by Ted Gioia is Amazons’ best-selling jazz text.  I’m enjoying it thus far, and was happy to see that it included a Recommended Listening index at the end of the book.

I also ordered two highly-acclaimed guides to 20th Century avant-garde music – The Rest is Noise: Listening to the 20th Century and Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music.

The Rest is Noise and Audio Culture

The Rest is Noise was a Pulitzer Prize Finalist and cracked the New York Times’ Top 10 Books of the Year.  Audio Culture is a compiled volume of manifestos and writings from every music theorist from the first discussions of noise by Jacques Attali and Luigi Russolo to a piece about post-digital tendencies in contemporary computer music by microtonal composer Kim Cascone.

Best of all, Audio Culture includes a hefty index with a chronology of noteworthy recordings, a glossary and a Select Discography.

I also enjoyed watching a documentary film this week titled, In the Ocean – A Film About the Classical Avant Garde which sparked my further exploration of musique concrete.

One of the interesting things I took from the film was the discovery that Cage was really interested in Finnegans Wake (his 1979 mesostic composition, Roaratorio is entirely based upon the novel both in structure and in content.)  And by delightful coincidence – what very title arrived in my mailbox just one day earlier?

Finnegans Wake

The Law of Very Large Numbers is a beautiful thing in practice.

All these new music books inspired me to print up some appropriate bookmarks, so I made these… (extra points if you can name the jazz record which featured the Jackson Pollock print.)

Bookmarks 06-14-14 sm

So pick up the music books I’ve featured, check out Magic of Ju-Ju and I’ll be back next week with a fantastic new box set!

Celebrating our 100th Post – Silence and Empty Words

Pencils ready!

Dear readers,

This is officially the 100th entry at The Innerspace Connection.  I have wonderful things planned for the coming month, featuring more great music and original content.  Innerspace has grown significantly in its readership in the last few years, and now I’m looking to you to find out what content you’d like to see in the next 100 posts.

I’m reaching out every active reader and passive lurker who follows this blog to answer this quick-and-easy 9-question survey.  Your responses will help me deliver the content you’re looking for in the future.   Thank you!

Click here and take the survey now!

It was a wonderful weekend.  My girlfriend spend it spinning Franz Liszt LPs,  and I picked up the next installment of John Cage’s lectures and writings for my library.

I queued up one of my new genre autoplaylists of modern-classical piano works while I read.  The list consisted of composers like Zazie Von Einem Anderen Stern, Ólafur Arnalds, Dustin O’Halloran (who you likely know from his collaboration with Adam Wiltzie performing as A Winged Victory for the Sullen), and selections from Reinbert De Leeuv performing the early piano works of Erik Satie.

This put me in a nostalgic Windham Hill mood, so I also threw in George Winston’s simple but enjoyable piano solos into the mix.  I finished off the set with the Interludes LP from Mannheim Steamroller which excerpts all the interludes from the Fresh Aire series of albums.  All in all excellent “thinking music” for a summer afternoon exploring the compositional processes of John Cage.

Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire Interludes

I’m still working my way through SILENCE: Lectures and Writings [50th Anniversary Edition] from last year’s Christmas wish-list.  My girlfriend and I stopped into our local used bookshop and I was delighted to come upon Cage’s Empty Words: Writings ’73-’78 which picks up right where SILENCE left off.

John Cage - Silence and Empty Words

Empty Words is hardly casual bathroom reading, as you can see from the random page selection below.  But in the full context of Cage’s writings it begins to make (some sort of) sense.

John Cage - Empty Words (excerpt)

I’ve just ordered another reference text – Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music by Christoph Cox and Daniel Warner.  I came upon the title quite by chance while researching texts on minimalism, and upon reading a particular review of the book I instantly ordered a copy.  Here is the review – from CMJ New Music Monthly.

“[Audio Culture] is an indispensable primer full of the theories behind noise, Free-jazz, minimalism, 20th century composition, ambient, avant-garde and all the other crazy shit your square-ass friends can’t believe you actually like. With writing and interviews from all the players in question (quoting Stockhausen is five points in hipster bingo), this book deconstructs all the essential ideas: Cage’s themes, Eno’s strategies, Zorn’s games and Merzbow’s undying love of porno.” –CMJ New Music Monthly, 7/04

The humor and wit of the review sold me 100% before I’d even read the item summary on Amazon.  This is particularly noteworthy as I rarely read texts written after the late 1970s.  (I have an affinity for Golden Age science fiction and classics of music non-fiction.)

I’ll be certain to post a review of the title, along with a second modern publication which I’ll keep under my hat for the moment.

That’s it for now.  Stay tuned for more, and if you haven’t already –  Click here and take the survey now!

Happy 100!

They Just Keep on Coming!

My pre-ordered copy of Brian Eno’s latest generative work, Lux has arrived at my record shop which I should be visiting next week.

In the meantime here are a few groovy titles that I’ve found in the wild.

This first album appeared on r/vinyl and I couldn’t get my wallet out fast enough.  I’ve been watching auctions for original copies of Beck’s Sea Change for months.  Every copy sells for about $40.  Then I found out about the special limited edition Black Friday release of the Mobile Fidelity 180g remaster and knew I had to act fast.  This is the first Mobile Fidelity release on a colored vinyl – marbled pink wax in this case.  And it sounds absolutely magnificent.

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Next I found two John Cage LPs in the trade-in boxes a customer dropped off at my local record shop.  They were a little musty so I may look to upgrade my copies later down the line.  They were Folkways Records’ Sound of New Music featuring Cage, Varese, Ussachevsky and others, and Indeterminacy by Cage and David Tudor.

Smithsonian Folkways - Sounds of New Music (Cage, Ussachevsky, Varese)

John Cage - Indeterminacy

Later that week I checked out Buffalo’s largest bookstore and took a chance on their small record section in the back.  Behind about 50 Elvis records I lucked out and found a sealed John Cage and David Tudor record!  It still had it’s $2 price sticker from 1966, which the shop kindly honored!

John Cage w David Tudor - Variations IV

Next up at my local Antique Mall I absolutely struck gold in the area of New Music.

I almost passed up this next disc because I knew I had the soundtrack to A Clockwork Orange at home.  But the vendor explained to me that this was a different album, entirely.  Most importantly it includes the full 13 minute version of “Timesteps,” one of the most famed in the history of early electronic recordings.  (The soundtrack version of the album trimmed it down to 4 minutes.)

Walter Carlos - Clockwork Orange

They also had a classic ambient album from Harold Budd – a Belgian import of Serpent in Quicksilver.

Harold Budd - Serpent in Quicksilver

Then I spotted this legendary Nonesuch release – Time’s Encomium.  Wuorinen won a Pulitzer Prize for this recording, making it the first all-electronic album to win the Prize and making Wuorinen the youngest-ever recipient.  It’s a wonderful milestone in early electronic sound.

Wuorinen - Time's Encomium

And finally there was this incredible LP which I had been after for weeks.  The Columbia-Princeston Electronic Music Center was founded in 1958 and this mono LP was released in 1964.  The only electronic record I’ve found that pre-dates this release is my copy of Forbidden Planet which was recorded in 1956.

Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center

That’s all for this week, I’ll post the new Eno album as soon as I pick it up!

Rare Sesame Street, John Cage, Zappa, and more!

It has been an absolutely amazing week for vinyl.

I started it off picking up one of the last Don Adams LP missing from my collection.  (I still need his self-titled first LP.)  The disc is titled, Don Adams Meets The Roving Reporter.  Not nearly as cool as my Agent 99 7″ radio promo, but a nice addition just the same.

Don Adams - Meets the Roving Reporter
Then I found another Sesame Street album that I didn’t have, which is getting more difficult now that I have nearly fourty Henson-related LPs.  Play-Along Songs is the re-issue of the Somebody Come And Play album from 1974.  Even the reissue is hard to come by, and I’m happy whenever I find material from the first ten years of Sesame Street.

Sesame Street - Play Along Songs

At a garage sale the same day I found three hardcover 7″ Sesame Street book-and-records, each with lyrics and an illustrated sleeve.  They were dated 1970.  I’m so glad I found them when I did, because they gave my brain something to connect with when I came across a real treasure the following weekend.

That was this morning when I hit up the Antique Mall and spotted a box set I’d never seen before with Sesame Street characters on the front.  To my surprise when I opened it, I found hardcover book-and-records just like the ones from the garage sale, but these were a complete set in near mint condition with the original box!

The Sesame Street Carry About (1970)

The Sesame Street Carry About (1970)

Sesame Street was first broadcast in 1969, and I could tell that this was from the first few years because of the images of the original Big Bird and orange Oscar the Grouch, both from Season 1.

The seller asked for $15 and I offered $10.  As soon as I got the set home I researched it and found out that it was in fact produced in 1970 along with the singles I had bought the weekend before.  The set contains songs from The Sesame Street Book & Record (which I have as well.)   And the catalog number was CCA 24509 – the first pressing for the set.  The binding is mint on the books, you can tell that the covers have not been opened all the way.  Better still, the handle is intact on box.  I found six other sets available for purchase online and none of them had the handle.  The first three sets I found were $89.99 each, the other three were priced between $100.00 and $500.00.

If I ever sell mine… I’m going back and giving the guy the extra $5.

Before I went home I made sure I stopped by the two record booths that bring me back to the Mall each weekend.  This time I found a classic comedy record I’ve loved for years – Steven Wright’s I Have a Pony.

If you’re not familiar with Stephen’s deadpan delivery, it’s hilarious.  Mitch Hedberg fans should definitely check him out.

I also found a John Cage promotional double LP from Tomato Records called Sonatas and Interludes For Prepared Piano & A Book of Music For Two Prepared Pianos.  Inside the NM jacket was a copy of a typewritten stapled document about the recording on Tomato letterhead along with the original kraft “Tomato Quality Product” inner sleeves.  I know the compositions are originally from 1948 and 1944 but I am not familiar with them so I’ll have to investigate further.  I didn’t mind paying $7 for it as copies start at $22 on the Web.

John Cage - Sonatas and Interludes For Prepared Piano / A Book of Music For Two Prepared Pianos

Just when I thought I was all done at the Mall I found two more discs.  How’s Your Bird is a 10″ compilation of early pre-Mothers Frank Zappa recordings released in Italy in 1998.  It was released as four different colored limited edition transparent discs, 1000 copies of each.  This copy is on clear vinyl.

Frank Zappa - How's Your Bird?

The seller didn’t really know anything about the disc and gave it to me for $5.  Copies are available online for between $27-$36.

The last disc was purchased purely out of nostalgia.  I’m a child of the 80s and found this disc tucked behind a GI-Joe album.

He Man & Skeletor - Masters of the Universe

He-Man & Skeletor – Masters of the Universe

I still have two large fold-out posters from He-Man magazine (thanks to a generous customer at work), and the He-Man LP should be good for a laugh if for nothing else.

All in all an excellent week of finds.  It’s good to know I’ll have fresh material to listen to come winter time.